Donate Now! Kickstarter -New Federal Theatre Stages Amiri Baraka’s final play, about W.E.B. DuBois.

Kickstart

This is NFTs Kickstarter campaign for Amiri Baraka’s Most DangerousMan in America(WEB Du BOIS). Please give it a look and help me by donating. 

baraka-e1316198665825The legacy of Amiri Baraka,who passed one year ago, January 9, is alive and vibrant on stages, in cafes and centers around the world; in the realm of social and traditional media and in the hearts of  his family and friends. 

This month, some of his closest friends of New York City theatre are kickstarting an effort to raise funds for the May production of the prolific writer-activist’s last play, written in 2011:

“Most Dangerous Man in America” (W.E.B. DuBois).  See some of the 200 items to be available to the you through Kickstarter donation
american theatre magazine

According to the prestigious, American Theatre magazine…  Woodie King Jr. has announced the programming in its 46th season, which will be dedicated to the late poet/playwright Amiri Baraka. The season, titled “The Amiri Baraka Project,” will contain two Baraka plays: his 1964 classic Dutchman, and the world premiere of his final play, Most Dangerous Man in America (W. E. B. Du Bois).

“Amiri Baraka and I shared a 50-year friendship,” said King in a statement. “Shortly after I arrived in New York City, he came to see the play I was directing at St. Mark’s Church-in-the-Bowery. We had in common a close friendship with Langston Hughes, and we both loved shoes and hats.” That led to King producing Baraka’s plays, starting in 1968 with Great Goodness of Life (a Coon Show), then Slaveship, The Toilet, A Recent Killing, Sidney Poet Heroical, and Boy and Tarzan Meet Again in a Clearing. Concluded King, “Baraka’s life and literary achievement as playwright should give us inspiration and courage, especially African-American artists.”

The title of Dutchman (Feb. 5–March 8) alludes to the Dutch East India Company, a 17th-century slave ship company. The play, a two-hander set in a New York City subway train, plays out a tense conversation between a young white woman and a young black man. Ryan Jillian Kilpatrick and Michael Alcide will star; both actors previously appeared in the Atlanta Black Theater Festival’s fall 2014 production of Dutchman. King will direct.

Most Dangerous Man in America, scheduled to open in May, is set during the McCarthy Era, when historian and activist W.E.B. DuBois was accused by the U.S. Federal Government in 1951 of being a foreign spy. The play moves back and forth between the courtroom and DuBois’s Harlem.

Read more

http://www.americantheatre.org/2015/01/13/new-federal-theatres-2015-season-dedicated-to-amiri-baraka/

Donate Now

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1577742797/most-dangerous-man-in-america-web-dubois-by-amiri?ref=discovery

Research Resource on W.E.B. DuBois:

Harvard University – Dr. DuBois’ Alma Mater http://hutchinscenter.fas.harvard.edu/research-projects/projects/w-e-b-du-bois-society

DuBois Research Library of Congress                                            http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/bib/dubois/

Special thanks photo credits from Kickstarter, New Federal Theatre, W.E.B. DuBois Institute and Dr. Henry Gates  and Sampsonia Way Online Magazine

Read: Woodie King Jr. Article in American Theatre magazine…In Memorium to Amiri Baraka

http://www.americantheatre.org/2014/03/14/in-memorium-amiri-baraka-1934-2014/

me and larry and AmiriI know personally that Amiri Baraka was a thinking man who also knew how to dance and laugh. He loved our legacy to think about contributing to a “no nonsense America” with a progressive future. He expected that we act like ‘legacy generations’ in that regard.

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